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The Making of Harry Potter
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Image by Dave Catchpole
Warner Bros Studio Tour London: The Making of Harry Potter
Warner Bros Studio, Aerodrome Way, Leavesden, Watford, Herts, WD25 7LS

A great day out for every fan of the boy wizard.

The Making of Harry Potter studio tour, covering 150,000 square foot, on two soundstages opened on the 31st March 2012, with stars galore at the red carpet launch at the Leavesden Studios where all eight movies were produced.

The home for many film productions, including several James Bond features, before a relatively new production company arrived there to make a film about a young boy who on his 11th birthday discovers he is a wizard.

Over the next ten years, the cast and crew of over 4,000 in total used more and more of the studios as the popularity of the books and films grew. The three young stars lived, grew up, went to school and turned into adults there on those stages.

Your tour begins in the foyer, with a flying Ford Anglia hanging from the ceiling and the walls adorned with huge photos of the cast, along with a few props.

Passing by the set of the cupboard under the stairs, you enter a room with a number of vertical TV screens showing Potter movie posters from around the world, followed by a short video sequence showing the rise of Harry’s popularity, the production teams discovery of the stories and the enormous worldwide success of the books and films.

Moving into the cinema, a short film introduced by Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson and Rupert Grint, talking about their experiences growing up on a film set for ten years, with clips from all eight films. The film ends with them standing in front of the main doors to the Great Hall and they walk in through the doors and invite you to follow them.

The screen at this point slowly rises to reveal the actual main doors to the Great Hall, surrounded with stone statues and carvings. What a wizard way to start the tour.

Walking through into the Great Hall we are told that we were now walking on the actual stone floor used in the films and seeing the actual tables where the actors ate their feasts. Dummies down each side of the hall wear the actual costumes used in the films. At the far end of the hall is the teachers’ table area, with more amazing costumes worn by Professors Dumbledore, Snape, McGonagall, Moody, Trelawney and Flitwick, as well as Hagrid and Filch too.

Leaving the Great Hall you enter the first of two vast sound stages. This includes sets for the Gryffindor Common Room and Dormitory, Dumbledore’s Office, Potions Classroom, Hagrid’s Hut, Burrow’s Kitchen and parts of the Ministry of Magic, also Umbridge’s gaudy pink, feline office. Each filled to the brim with props and costumes.

Props can be seen everywhere, with a massive cage in the centre, chock-a-block with goblets, chandeliers, wands and armour. A huge glass case contains the wands of 24 of the major characters – less than 1 percent of the total number of wands made for the films. The ornate doors to a Gringott’s vault and to the Chamber of Secrets are seen after passing a wall dedicated to the paintings produced to decorate the walls of Hogwarts.

Below the giant swinging pendulum of the Hogwarts castle clock there are several huge touch screens containing an interactive Marauders Map.

There are sections of the soundstage dedicated to various movie-making crafts. The hair and makeup section, costumes section, animal department, graphic design and production.
The final section in this first soundstage is dedicated to the Special Effects department with three huge video screens showing all the tricks and techniques, including greenscreen footage and CGI. Props attached to their motion rigs, include the Gringott’s Vault Cart and Mad-Eye Moody’s Recumbent Broomstick.

In separate room you can have a go on a broomstick or drive the Ford Anglia yourself, using the greenscreen technology.

The Backlot about half way round the tour is an open air section between the two soundstages where refreshments are available, including Butterbeer the popular wizarding beverage.

Also featured on the backlot are the Knight Bus, another Ford Anglia, Hagrid’s motorbike/sidecar, the Riddle family tombstone, a section of the rickety wooden Hogwarts Bridge, Potter’s burnt out cottage from Godric’s Hollow and Number 4 Privet Drive.

Entering the second soundstage you pass some of the giant chess pieces from the first movie. A number of video screens here progressively show what it was like to work in the creature shop, cleverly leading you from one screen to the next, past models of Fawkes, a snapping Monster Book of Monsters and a giant animatronic head of Hagrid. The next room has the life size (i.e., ENORMOUS!) model of Aragog the spider and one of three animatronic Buckbeak models.

Walking around the corner (WOW) you are transported into another world entirely. The dark lighting and cobbled street can only mean one thing – you have entered Diagon Alley. The shops using the original sets have been rebuilt– Flourish & Blotts, Eeylops Owl Emporium, Potage’s Cauldron Shop and of course Ollivander’s Wand Shop, each and every one them is crammed full of detail. At the other end of the street is Weasleys’ Wizard Wheezes, with the bright orange shopfront standing out from the crowd of blackness and featuring a moving model of one of the red-haired twins doffing his hat.

At the end of Diagon Alley you move onto the Art and Design department with walls covered with architectural drawings and detailed plans, accurate down to the millimetre, for many of the props and sets already seen. A draftsman’s table serves as a projection screen for another video about the work of the art department.

Moving on, up the ascending path are walls full of concept paintings and artwork, also intricate cardboard models of Hogsmead and the Hogwarts.

You are only looking at a model of the model though, as entering the next room, there, spread over at least 15 square metres is the most amazing, complex and elaborate model built to a 1:24 scale. It has a bigger footprint than the average house.

The last part of the tour is a fitting tribute to the crew and cast of the most popular film franchise of all time. A much tidier recreation of the interior of Ollivander’s Wand shop, with over 4,000 wand boxes lining its shelves – one for every single person who worked on the films.

Exit through the Gift Shop.

PA – Mill Run: Fallingwater – Kitchen
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Image by wallyg
Modern for its day, the Fallingwater kitchen was equipped with St. Charles metal cabinets, a Swedish AGA stove, red asphalt tiles, and a Formica-topped work table designed by Wright. The Kaufmanns’ chef Elsie Henderson purchased the state of-of-the-art turquoise-lined Imperial Cyclomatic CT150 Frigidaire in the 1950s. The Formica that tops the counters and Wright’s table was only patented in 1935, but Kaufmann learned of it early because it was invented locally by two engineers at Westinghouse.

Fallingwater, sometimes referred to as the Edgar J. Kaufmann Sr. Residence or just the Kaufmann Residence, located within a 5,100-acre nature reserve 50 miles southeast of Pittsburgh, was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and built between 1936 and 1939. Built over a 30-foot flowing waterfall on Bear Run in the Mill Run section of Stewart Township, Fayette County, Pennsylvania, the house served as a vacation retreat for the Kaufmann family including patriarch, Edgar Kaufmann Sr., was a successful Pittsburgh businessman and president of Kaufmann’s Department Store, and his son, Edgar Kaufmann, Jr., who studied architecture briefly under Wright. Wright collaborated with staff engineers Mendel Glickman and William Wesley Peters on the structural design, and assigned his apprentice, Robert Mosher, as his permanent on-site representative throughout construction. Despite frequent conflicts between Wright, Kaufmann, and the construction contractor, the home and guesthouse were finally constructed at a cost of 5,000.

Fallingwater was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1966. It was listed among the Smithsonian’s 28 Places to See Before You Die. In a 1991 poll of members of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), it was voted "the best all-time work of American architecture." In 2007, Fallingwater was ranked #29 on the AIA 150 America’s Favorite Architecture list.

National Register #74001781 (1974)

Hampton Court Palace
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Image by failing_angel
Hampton Court Palace began with Cardinal Thomas Wolsey (c.1473-1530) acquiring what was then a grange from the Order of St John (the Knights Hospitaller) in 1514 and redeveloping it as a palace. The new palace included the Base Court (which included 40 guest lodgings), and the inner Clock Court (which had state apartments for Henry VIII, Katherine of Aragon and the Princess Mary). The palace was used for hosting state functions such as diplomatic visits as well as entertainments.
In 1529 Hampton Court passed to Henry following Wolsey’s downfall, at which point Henry built upon and developed an already substantial palace. The new complex included larger kitchens, a chapel and great hall, as well as tennis courts, a bowling alley and tiltyard. Starting less than 6 months of taking possession, Henry’s works weren’t complete until 1540.
Each of Henry’s heirs stayed at Hampton Court (indeed Edward VI was born there), although only Elizabeth I made any changes and those were relatively minor; this was similar under the Stuarts, with the next changes to the palace happening with William and Mary.
Sir Christopher Wren (1632-1723) was comissioned to design a new palace, but the cost of demolishing the existing building was too prohibitive, instead the east and south sides were rebuilt.
The last phase of construction happened with the Hanoverians, with Sir John Vanbrugh (1664-1726) designing the Queen’s apartments under George I, and William Kent (c. 1685-1748) the Queen’s staircase and Cumberland Suite under George II.
The royal family left Hampton Court in 1737, after which time the palace became grace and favour apartments for a century, before being opened to the public by Queen Victoria.

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